Is your organization ready for change?

By Jon Coss, CEO

February 20, 2016

By the time we engage with an agency, they are fully convinced that they need to change something: the way they are detecting fraud, waste, and abuse, or maybe the way they are managing cases. When it comes to change though, we’ve found that the devil truly is in the details.

Each of your staff will typically fall into one of the following categories. It’s important to recognize this and to staff your change projects appropriately.

Champions: These people embrace the future vision and want to help achieve it. They love new challenges but also expect that they’ll need to find ways around unexpected problems. They vocalize successes and accept changes for the “long haul”. Projects without champions will never meet their potential.

Cynics: Unlike champions, these people think that the change, usually any change, is not necessary. They perceive their value in their knowledge of how “things have always worked” and any threat to this is a threat to them. There is no way to change a cynic’s mind and no way to bring them on board. Cynics are never good for a change project. It’s important to recognize them and keep them to the side.

Skeptics: Skeptics, which can often be confused for cynics, need proof to get on board with a change effort. They need to be convinced that the change is good for the agency or for them. Skeptics are a vital component to project staffing because the rest of your agency will clearly see when a skeptic has been “converted” to a champion.

Followers: This category makes up the majority of staff assigned to most projects. At the beginning of the project, they will contribute and won’t do anything to undermine the effort. As the project progresses, they will move to whichever side is gaining momentum: success or failure. This is why champions and converted skeptics are so important—they generate excitement and commitment from followers.

If this all sounds obvious, I challenge you to think back to a change effort that you’ve observed that should have succeeded but managed to fail short of expectations. You may very well find that the reason was that identifying “change readiness” was either done incorrectly or ignored altogether. We’re not advocating expensive, complex, and lengthy change processes. But we are suggesting that you think about this before engaging in any important project or process change.


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