Disturbing Reports of Nursing Home Abuse

By Jon Coss, CEO

April 24, 2017

Last month CNN published a horrifying report on sexual abuse in America’s nursing homes and assisted living facilities. The report provided details on dozens of assaults, rapes, and other incidents that, quite frankly, were extremely difficult to read. In my opinion, however, this level of detail is probably necessary to shock people into taking action against what CNN rightly labelled “an unchecked epidemic”.

The numbers themselves are devastating. Approximately one million senior citizens are currently residing in 15,000 government-regulated long term care facilities. Since 2000, it appears that over 16,000 cases of sexual abuse have been reported, but the number is probably higher because of complex reporting systems and processes. And it’s impossible to determine the number of unreported cases.

Between 2013 – 2016, CNN found that 1,000 government-regulated facilities had been cited for mishandling or failing to prevent sexual assaults. 100 of the facilities had been cited numerous times. And despite this, only 226 facilities were fined just $9 million. Only 16 of the facilities were cut off from Medicaid and Medicare!

What is equally disturbing to the actual cases of abuse is the blatant disregard of safeguards and even the intentional impeding of investigations. Consider a case here in California where the employer allowed a nurse to continue working for weeks after reports of him kissing and fondling a female resident. This crime, by the way, resulted in only a $27,000 fine.

At Pondera, we often say that fraud and abuse is most prevalent at the intersection of large amounts of money and vulnerable populations. This makes nursing homes “ground zero” for abuse because it is here that the escalating costs of long term care combine with dementia and other health issues that can make senior citizens problematic witnesses.

Among several recommendations made by CNN was a call for improved reporting systems. We agree that this is an important piece of the solution. It will provide greater transparency and help regulators identify trends and clusters of abuse. But clearly, stricter oversite and enforcement are needed. So too is the type of no-nonsense reporting that CNN did for this report.